Archive for the 'Hau Family' Category

Tombstone Tuesday | Elizabeth Hau

Elizabeth Hau was a younger sister of my grandfather, Raymond Hau. She died as an infant in 1909. Elizabeth is buried in Calvary Cemetery in Fond du Lac, Fond du Lac Co., WI.

Elizabeth Hau
Daughter of John and Elizabeth (Fuhrman) Hau
Born:  June 23, 1909
Died:  July 15, 1909

Wilhelm Hau

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My Great Great Grandfather, Wilhelm Hau, is buried in St. Joseph’s Cemetery in St. Joe, Marshfield Twp., Fond du Lac Co., WI. He was born on November 25, 1842 in Prussia.

We don’t know a lot about Wilhelm.  One family story states that “…he came to America from Prussia. His family were wealthy land owners who had tenant farms. He fled Germany because of the conscription under King Wilhelm. He served in the Prussian Army and had a crippled small finger and a scar on his face as a result. He played the violin and was a choir director in Germany. He came to America with his sister from, we think Stuttgart, but she died at sea.”

We do know that Wilhelm settled in the Town of Russell in Sheboygan Co., WI in the 1860’s. He married Katherine Tuepper on January 12, 1869, in nearby Mt. Calvary. Together they had 9 children. His farm was not far from St. Joseph’s Catholic Church. He is listed a donor toward it’s building. One donation was for $65 and another was for the purchase of windows for the new church in 1871.

Wilhelm died at the age of 41 on August 12, 1884.

St. Joseph’s Cemetery, St. Joe, Marshfield Twp., Fond du Lac Co., WI

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St. Joseph’s Catholic Church and cemetery are located in St. Joe, Marshfield Twp., WI

The first church was made of logs and built in 1860, on land donated by local farmers. It was started as a mission church from nearby Mt. Calvary. The first death occurred in 1866. In May of that year, an energetic priest announced a new project: the church graveyard should be brought into order. A few days later, large boulders were dug up and dragged away by oxen. Three stumps were dug out and the ground was leveled. Posts were set around the border and boards nailed to them. More about the history of the church can be read here.



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